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So far SciWorks has created 9 blog entries.

2017 Planetarium Show Schedule

2017 January Saturday September 11:00 AM In My Backyard 12:00 PM Planet Patrol 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 4:00 PM Space and Beyond (15 minute musical laser show) Sunday 1:00 PM In My Backyard 2:00 PM Planet Patrol 3:00 PM Space and Beyond (15 minute musical laser show) February Saturday 11:00 AM Sol and Company 12:00 PM Follow the Drinking Gourd 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 4:00 PM Laser Fun (15 minute musical laser show) Sunday 1:00 PM Sol and Company 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 3:00 PM Laser Fun (15 minute musical laser show) March Saturday 11:00 AM Rusty Rocket's Last Blast 12:00 PM Explorers 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 4:00 PM Space and Beyond (15 minute musical laser show) Sunday 1:00 PM Rusty Rocket's Last Blast 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 3:00 PM Space and Beyond (15 minute musical laser show) April Saturday 11:00 AM Case of the Disappearing Dinosaurs 12:00 PM Mars 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 4:00 PM Laser Fun (15 minute musical laser show) Sunday 1:00 PM Case of the Disappearing Dinosaurs 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 3:00 PM Laser Fun (15 minute musical laser show) May Saturday 11:00 AM In My Backyard 12:00 PM WSKY 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 4:00 PM Space and Beyond (15 minute musical laser show) Sunday 1:00 AM In My Backyard 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 3:00 PM Space and Beyond (15 minute musical laser show) June Saturday 11:00 AM Rusty Rocket's Last Blast 12:00 PM Ring World 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 4:00 PM Laser Fun (15 minute musical laser show) Sunday 1:00 PM Rusty Rocket's Last Blast 2:00 PM Live Sky Tour 3:00 PM Laser Fun (15 minute musical laser [...]

The Young Astronomers Newsletter

The Forsyth Astronomical Society's The Young Astronomers Newsletter For September is available for download here <pdf>! The publication is written by SciWorks Planetarium's Bob Patsiga. See earlier publications here.

Duke Energy Foundation Supports SciWorks’ ‘Adopt-a-School’ Program

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (May 25, 2016) — SciWorks has received a generous gift from the Duke Energy Foundation to support the museum’s “Adopt-a-School” program. The money will be used to provide educational programming for Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools that participate in the Title 1 program.  “Our support of science museums is intended to encourage STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education, and SciWorks is a wonderful community resource that provides just that,” says Jimmy Flythe, Duke Energy’s Director of Government and Community Relations for the West Region. “Our ultimate goal is to assist our community in preparing a future workforce that can thrive in a changing economy, while supporting organizations that make our community more attractive for businesses to move and expand here.” Currently, all schools in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School System receive free admission to SciWorks. Gifts received for the “Adopt-a-School” program enable SciWorks to also provide programming that can enrich and engage student learning in the classroom and is aligned with the N.C. Essential Standards for Science. “With the generosity of organizations such as the Duke Energy Foundation, we can direct our energy into expanding access and opportunity to underprivileged sectors of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County,” says Paul Kortenaar, SciWorks’ Executive Director. “We can help children who cannot afford a museum educational program  receive the kind of high-quality, experiential science programming that many other students throughout the country are able to explore and enjoy.”

SciWorks Radio, SciWorks After Dark, WFDD Listening Party

Join us for a very special SciWorks After Dark! This time around we are partnering with WFDD as a combined event with their very popular listening parties! Hosted by SciWorks Radio personality Shawn Fitzmaurice, we'll listen to three episodes of SciWorks Radio and then have a fun conversation with the scientists from each episode! This free event will be held at SciWorks on Tuesday, February 23, 2016, from 6 pm to 9 pm. There will be food trucks, including Food Freaks, La Vie En Rose, and Taqueria Luciano's, as well as beverages provided by The Porch Kitchen and Cantina. Grab dinner join the fun, and get your science on! SciWorks is located at 400 W Hanes Mill Rd, Winston-Salem, NC 27105 Get directions here.

Volvo Group of Companies Donates to ‘Adopt-a-School’ Program

SciWorks has received a generous gift from Volvo Group of Companies to support the museum’s “Adopt-a-School" program. The money will be used to provide educational programming for North Hills Elementary School, a Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School that participates in the Title 1 program. “We are so excited about this wonderful opportunity to partner with Volvo Companies and Sciworks,” says Karen Morning Roseboro, Ed.D, principal at North Hills Elementary. “We are currently working very hard to improve science instruction, and this is a great way to extend learning beyond the classroom!” Currently, all schools in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School System receive free admission to SciWorks. The “adoption” of North Hills Elementary provides an educational program in addition to the free admission for any class at the elementary school on a field trip to SciWorks. “The SciWorks 'Adopt-a-School' program offers students at federally funded schools the opportunity to learn through a hands-on experience without burdening the child’s family or the school with an additional cost,” says Dennis Slagle, president of Volvo Group Trucks Sales North America. “It is Volvo’s hope that by adopting North Hills Elementary School, we will help those students foster an interest in science and engineering — and result in some of them pursuing careers in those fields, which is critical to the success of Volvo Group.”

SciWorks Radio: New Discoveries From NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Pluto : What We've Learned By Shawn Fitzmaurice To keep updated on NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto, visit the SciWorks Pluto Page. Find this and all past SciWorks Radio episodes at http://wfdd.org/programs/sciworks-radio Learn how NASA got to Pluto with this special web-only episode of SciWorks Radio.    Pluto's "Heart-shaped region has been unofficially referred to as the Tombaugh Regio-Image Credit: NASA/APL/SwRI On July 14th, NASA’s New Horizons space probe raced past the dwarf planet Pluto at 44 thousand miles per hour. Loaded with an array of Science instruments, the sturdy little probe gathered data which will be sent to us over the next 16 months.This episode was recorded before NASA’s recent press conference, but keep an eye onhttp://sciworks.org/pluto for up-to-date mission information. You’ll also find a special web-only episode about the mission, and details specifically for this episode. What have we learned from New Horizons since the encounter? Stunning new images show that Pluto and its moon Charon are far more interesting than we imagined. The surfaces are young, suggesting active geology. A now iconic image shows us Pluto’s massive heart-shaped region, which NASA has named the Tombaugh Reggio It’s named after Clyde Tombaugh, the man who discovered Pluto in 1930. That’s an area of smooth, what appears to be ice bordered by rough mountains and crater areas that are dark. So, we’re in the process of taking a look at these to see what that material might be made out of. We’ve seen a couple of mountain ranges around the Tombaugh Reggio and one of those is about on the scale of the Rockies in terms of height, and the other is on the scale of the [...]

SciWorks Radio Extra: How we got to Pluto

How We Got To Pluto Launched in 2006, NASA’s New Horizons space probe made its historic fly-by of the dwarf planet Pluto on July 14th. For regularly updated information about Pluto and its moons, check out http://scioworks.org/pluto. There you'll find a companion blog to this recording with links and details. For an update about the science coming in from New Horizons, check out SciWorks Radio on July 26th, to be archived at wfdd.org. I wanted to get some background information to SciWorks Radio listeners and to do that, I spoke with Jonathan Ward, volunteer NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador, and author of two brand new books about the Apollo missions. New Horizons is a space probe that was first proposed about 22 to 23 years ago. Pluto being the last major body in the solar system that hadn’t been explored yet and there was talk about some sort of way to get a probe out there in a reasonable amount of time at a reasonable cost to be able to see what the Pluto system looks like. There was a bit of a hurry to get it out there because we were starting to realize that Pluto has a dynamic atmosphere that actually starts to freeze away and condense onto its surface as it moves farther away from the sun, so the thought was if we didn’t get a probe to Pluto before it started moving farther away from the sun in its orbit that we might miss the opportunity to study its atmosphere. So that’s why there was a bit of a hurry to get the mission off when they did Pluto is [...]

New Horizon – NASA’s Mission to Pluto. Mission Details

New Horizons -By Bruce Gavett New Horizons was launched in January 2006.    It achieved a gravity assist from Jupiter in February 2007.  All of its speed was achieved at the launch and through the gravity assist from Jupiter. New Horizons is travelling at 36,000 miles per hour and will pass within 8,000 miles of Pluto on July 14 at 7:50 AM EDT. Find out more about New Horizons New Horizons Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/ New Horizons NASA: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html New Horizons Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Horizons “Pluto Flyby Toolkit” NASA Solar System Exploration: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/plutotoolkit.cfm Spacecraft System and Components” Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Mission/Spacecraft/Systems-and-Components.php Find out more about New Horizons New Horizons Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/ New Horizons NASA: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html New Horizons Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Horizons “Pluto Flyby Toolkit” NASA Solar System Exploration: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/plutotoolkit.cfm “Spacecraft System and Components” Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Mission/Spacecraft/Systems-and-Components.php New Horizons (and Pluto) on YouTube “New Horizons” National Space Society (2:52): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aky9FFj4ybE&index=1&list=PLwUI6RMSqnmTTI_4j2x0m0SCgOCYNky1J “The Year of Pluto – Trailer” NASA (2:41): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyYZ-sGwm8Q&index=2&list=PLwUI6RMSqnmTTI_4j2x0m0SCgOCYNky1J “The Year of Pluto” NASA (58:33): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJxwWpaGoJs&index=3&list=PLwUI6RMSqnmTTI_4j2x0m0SCgOCYNky1J Images from New Horizons As New Horizons approaches Pluto we can see clearly see both Pluto and Charon.  Pluto is a bit reddish (something like Mars).  Charon is darker and mostly gray. Both Images Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute Within 5 million miles, some of Pluto’s surface features become visible.  Can you see the “Heart”, the “Whale’s Tale” and the “Puzzling Spots”? All Images Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute Find More New Horizons Images and Videos (most recent at the top) http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Multimedia/Science-Photos/image.php?gallery_id=2&image_id=215 [...]

Pluto Facts – Prepare for our arrival at Pluto!

  -By Bruce Gavett Today, July 14, after over 9 years and 3 billion miles, the New Horizons Spacecraft will pass within 8,000 miles of the dwarf planet Pluto.  This will be the first close up look at the former 9th Planet. Here are some facts about Pluto Pluto (the Dwarf Planet) Pluto was discovered in 1930 by Clyde W. Tombaugh at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff.    The name Pluto was suggested by an eleven-year-old English girl, Venetia Burney.   It was Venetia’s grandfather that passed on her suggestion and the name was chosen. Pluto was considered the 9th planet for many years.   In 2006, Pluto was reclassified by the International Astronomical Union to a dwarf planet along with the asteroid Ceres and Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) Eris.    In 2008, KBOs Haumea and Makemake were added to the list of dwarf planets. Pluto is small and tilted on its side. Pluto, with a diameter of 1,430 miles, is roughly 2/3 the width of the Earth’s Moon.    If you weigh 100 lbs. on the Earth, you would only weigh 7 lbs. on Pluto. Pluto, along with Uranus, are the two “planets” that rotate on their side. Pluto has an unusual orbit Pluto’s 248 year orbit is inclined to the plane of the Solar System by 17o. The eight planets have close to circular orbits.   Pluto’s orbit is more elongated.  It is within 2.8 billion miles from the Sun at it nearest point and comes inside the orbit of Neptune for twenty years.    At its farthest point, it is 4.6 billion miles from the Sun. Pluto has five moons Pluto’s large moon Charon was discovered in 1978 and, with a diameter of 750 miles, is half the width [...]

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